San Elizario ISD Raises Passing Rate on STAAR Grade 5 Science Assessment by 20 Percentage Points by Using the STEMscopes Digital STEM Curriculum

Posted by Javier Encinas on November 01, 2016

 

 

 

 

Houston— Nov. 1, 2016— In 2016, 77 percent of fifth graders in San Elizario Indpendent School District (ISD) successfully passed the STAAR® science test, up from 57 percent in 2015. What changed? During the 2015-16 school year, teachers began using STEMscopes™ Texas as their primary science curriculum. Developed by Accelerate Learning™and Rice University, STEMscopes is the most widely used science curriculum in Texas. 

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Topics: STEMscopes Texas

Fifth Graders in Texas School Districts Using STEMscopes from Accelerate Learning Achieve Higher Passing Rates on STAAR Science Test

Posted by Javier Encinas on November 20, 2015

 

 

Using the STEMscopes Texas comprehensive, hands-on science curriculum also increases the passing rates for economically disadvantaged students in these districts

 

Houston, TX – Nov. 19, 2015 – Accelerate Learning today announces the publication of a new study examining the     2014-15 State of Texas Assessments of Academic Readiness (STAAR™) passing rates for school districts that used the STEMscopes™ curriculum. The study, which included more than 360,000 students, showed that districts using STEMscopes had higher passing rates on the fifth grade STAAR science test than districts that did not use STEMscopes. The findings are similar to earlier studies conducted by Rice University, which also reported higher fifth grade passing rates for districts with STEMscopes.

Using data retrieved from http://tea.texas.gov/student.assessment/staar/aggregate the 2015 study showed the average passing rate for Texas school districts that include fifth grade was 68.2 percent. Of these districts, 311 districts used the STEMscopes science curriculum for more than half of their student population, and 877 districts used either a district-created science curriculum or purchased a different science curriculum. The average passing rate was 71.4 percent for the STEMscopes districts, and 67.0 percent for the non-STEMscopes districts.

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Topics: STEMscopes Texas

STEMscopes Texas Releases New Impact Study

Posted by David Alviar on October 28, 2015

 

Houston, TX — October 28th, STEMscopes released a new impact study that compared 5th grade STAAR™ passing rates for districts that used STEMscopes curriculum as well as non-STEMscopes districts. Using over 360,000 students in the study, the results show that STEMscopes significantly improved students' performance on high stakes testing.

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Topics: high school, STEMscopes Texas

A New Logo for a New STEMscopes

Posted by Science Explored on December 18, 2013

As we move into a new year, we are looking at STEMscopes in a new light.  Not only are we transitioning from a small department within Rice University to a full partner as Accelerate Learning, we are also preparing to unveil STEMscopes 2.0 in its entirety.  No need to worry though – let us address a few of the “rumors” we have heard regarding this transition:  1) we are not being bought out by “some company” (in fact, we are the creators of Accelerate Learning), 2) our dedication to teachers and students remains immutable, and 3) our ties with Rice University have been fortified while allowing us to grow substantially.

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Topics: Science Explored and Archive, STEMscopes Texas

Tackling Poverty with STEMscopes™ Texas

Posted by Science Explored on December 10, 2012

Recently, the Commissioner of Education convened with twenty-three high performing districts across Texas to discuss the future of education.  15 of the 23, or 65%, of the selected districts were users of STEMscopes™.  You can imagine our ear-to-ear grins as we heard the news!  Still, education in the lone star state has a ways to go and though the consortium has four pivotal areas of discussion (digital learning, learning standards, variety of assessments, and community interaction), poverty is not one of them. 

The effects of poverty are profound on learning.  Students living below the poverty line often endure hardship from a lack of early childhood stimulation, stunted social skills, and a feeling of apathy towards formal education.  It goes without saying that this is unfair to the child and a serious challenge for his or her teacher.  

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Topics: Science Explored and Archive, STEMscopes Texas